Networking Grant Recipients

Planning Grants

The Role of Religiosity in the Motivation to Adopt

Gretchen Miller Wrobel
Project Director
Professor of Psychology
Bethel University

Harold D. Grotevant
Rudd Family Foundation Chair in Psychology
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Emily Helder
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Calvin College

Elisha Marr
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Calvin College

Abstract:

Adoption is a prevalent complex family form in the United States and provides permanent families for children who cannot be parented by birth relatives. Understanding the motivation to adopt has important practical applications for families adopting a child, birth parents placing a child and agencies facilitating adoption. The purpose of this planning grant is to use a multidisciplinary lens to explore how religiosity impacts the motivation to adopt a child. As such, a primary aim of the planning grant is to provide time and multidisciplinary expertise to consider how three important data sets (Calvin Adoption Project,Minnesota-Texas Adoption Project, National Survey of Adoptive Parents) work together to address the motivation to adopt a child. The use of existing, major data sets will provide an efficient means for addressing the issue.

 

Religion without Shakespeare: Staging Faith in Early Modern, Non-Shakespearean Drama

Matthew J. Smith
Project Director
Assistant Professor of English
Azusa Pacific University 

Brett Foster
Associate Professor of English
Wheaton College

Clare Costley King'oo
Associate Professor of English
University of Connecticut at Storrs

Abstract

The study of Renaissance religion and drama remains biased by Shakespeare’s unrivaled canonical identity. Furthermore, scholars often view scenes of religious import in works by contemporaneous dramatists as messy, conventional, or pragmatic. “Religion without Shakespeare” seeks to focus purposefully on religion in the works of non-Shakespearean Renaissance plays and yet also to bring such readings to bear on the predominant criticism of Shakespeare and religion—both challenging and advancing it. “Religion without Shakespeare” proposes a long-term conversation among leading scholars in religion and early modern drama studies that questions the secularization thesis that pervades Shakespeare studies and that advances our understanding of the relations between religious and play going culture by focusing on important non-Shakespearean early modern dramatists.

 

Initiative Grants

Evangelical Protestantism and Social Change in 21st Century Brazil

Eric Miller
Project Director
Professor of History and the Humanities
Geneva College

Andy Draycott
Associate Professor of Theology and Christian Ethics
Biola University

Alexandre Brasil Fonseca
Professor of Sociology
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

Daniela Sanches Fronzi
Research Associate, Department of Social and Applied Nutrition
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

Ronald Morgan
Professor of History
Abilene Christian University

Gustavo Gilson S. de Oliveira
Professor Sociology at the Center of Education
Universidade Ferderal de Pernambuco

Abstract

The rapid rise of evangelical Protestantism throughout the global south has begun to attract attention not only on the ground, but also in the academy. Somewhat belatedly, scholars across the disciplines are attempting to understand the social, cultural, and political significance of these historic shifts. Our project exists within this nexus of academic ferment with a particular focus on Brazil, now both the world's largest Roman Catholic and Pentecostal country. The number of evangelical Protestants in Brazil is believed to be second only to the United States.

The team members for this project are writing a book that will lay out a narrative framework of the history and rise of evangelical Protestantism in Brazil. It will also include multi-disciplinary assessments of contemporary Brazilian evangelicalism based partly on participant-observer analysis. The book's particular focus will be on the social and political dimensions of Brazilian evangelicalism. The team members will also create a scholarly alliance of Brazilian and CCCU-centered scholars who, while writing the book, will also work to strengthen organizational structures for ongoing collaboration

 

Soprani Compagni: Portraits of Women in Contemporary Soprano Duet

Lisa Dawson
Project Co-Director
Professor of Music, Voice and Opera Studies
Indiana Wesleyan University

Tammie Huntington
Project Co-Director
Associate Professor of Music, Voice and Opera Studies
Indiana Wesleyan University

Phoenix Park-Kim
Project Co-Director
Professor of Music, Piano Performance Studies
Indiana Wesleyan University

Jesse Ayers
Professor of Music
Malone University

Robert Denham
Associate Professor Theory and Composition
Biola University

David Fuentes
Professor of Composition and Theory
Calvin College

Leanna Kirchoff
Instructor of Composition
University of Denver

Todd Syswerda
Professor of Music, Composition Studies
Indiana Wesleyan University

Abstract:

The soprano voice is the most common classification among singers, often producing an intense rivalry when competing for roles and positions. One of the ways in which this conundrum may be addressed is through collaboration among sopranos using duet literature within the vocal studio and onstage. However, duets written specifically for two sopranos are very rare and difficult to locate. The ensemble Soprani Compagni was formed in 2010 for the express purpose of researching, compiling, and performing art songs, oratorio, and opera written specifically for two soprano voices; to model the art of collaboration between sopranos; and to commission new works for soprano duet.

In this initiative, Soprani Compagni will commission works that emphasize significant women and their many varied and valuable contributions to our society, during Biblical times and beyond. Soprano repertoire often depicts limited portraits of women, themed around love for her man, external beauty and unfulfilled dreams. This initiative will result in an expansion of soprano duet repertoire with messages of encouragement for more women to embrace their true worth, value, and calling by bringing to light contributions of women in our society through performances by women and about women, connecting our hearts and lives across generations. 

The duet recording and anthology will be disseminated through performances at collaborating composers’ universities throughout the country and abroad.

 

Supplemental Grant

A Living Presence: Reinvigorating the Music of Georg Philipp Telemann in Service to Liturgy and Life

Michael D. Shasberger
Project Director
Adams Professor of Music and Worship
Westmont College

Trey Farrell
Adjunct Professor of Music
Westmont College

Trevor Handy
Adjunct Professor of Music
Westmont College

Han Soo Kim
Assistant Professor of Music
Westmont College

Susan Kim
Assistant Professor of Music
Gordon College

Sarita Kwok
Associate Professor of Music
Gordon College

Cindy Lindeen-Martin
Minister of Music and Organist
Augustana Lutheran Church of Denver

Abstract

This project will bring to the public recently published Telemann cantatas, and instrumental music that will compliment and contrast with the cantatas, in order to enliven contemporary worshipping communities and performance audiences with the music and witness of Georg Philipp Telemann, an under-represented baroque master. The ensemble, consisting of string quartet, oboe, keyboard (harpsichord or organ) and vocalist, will perform in a variety of concert, school, and liturgical settings and will also sponsor educational programs including lecture demonstrations and school outreach events.

Bringing to life the cantatas of Georg Phillip Telemann that have only recently been published in modern performance editions is an important link to the performance practice of 17th - 18thcentury, the liturgical life of the Reformation period, and the theology of the era. Particular emphasis will be placed on the cantatas from the “Engle Jahrgang” (Angel Cycle) that were likely written for the city of Frankfurt late in Telemann’s life. Telemann, who is frequently overshadowed by his contemporaries Bach and Handel, was in many ways more highly regarded in his own time than those masters. This project will bring some of his least known, but most wonderfully crafted work to light in performance, liturgical, and lecture settings.